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Frankenstein Friday


Hey ya'll Beanie here. Are you as excited as I am that Halloween is tomorrow. I can't contain my excitement.


But before all that how appropriate is it that today is Frankenstein Friday!


Celebrated each year on the last Friday of October, Frankenstein Friday pays homage to one of the greatest gothic stories of all time. In 1818, Mary Shelley wrote a novel about a young scientist named Victor Frankenstein who discovers how to give life to inanimate bodies. He creates a monster that pursues him to the ends of the earth and eventually destroys everything he holds dear.


People often mistakenly use the name “Frankenstein” to refer to the hideous monster

(famously played by Boris Karloff in the 1931 film), but Victor Frankenstein never gives his creation a name. Read a chapter from the book, send a free monster ecard to your friends, or create a mad scientist Halloween costume to celebrate Frankenstein Friday!



Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is an 1818 novel written by English author Mary Shelley (1797–1851) that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was 18, and the first edition was published anonymously in London on 1 January 1818, when she was 20.[2] Her name first appeared in the second edition published in Paris in 1821.


Shelley travelled through Europe in 1815 along the river Rhine in Germany stopping in Gernsheim, 17 kilometres (11 mi) away from Frankenstein Castle, where two centuries before, an alchemist engaged in experiments.[3][4][5] She then journeyed to the region of Geneva, Switzerland, where much of the story takes place. The topics of galvanism and occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions,

particularly her lover and future husband Percy B. Shelley. In 1816, Mary, Percy and Lord Byron had a competition to see who could write the best horror story. After thinking for days, Shelley dreamt about a scientist who created life and was horrified by what he had made, inspiring the novel.[6]


Though Frankenstein is infused with elements of the Gothic novel and the Romantic movement, Brian Aldiss has argued that it should be considered the first true science fiction story. In contrast to previous stories with fantastical elements resembling those of later science fiction, Aldiss states the central character "makes a deliberate decision" and "turns to modern experiments in the laboratory" to achieve fantastic results.[7] It has had a considerable influence in literature and popular culture and spawned a complete genre of horror stories, films and plays.


Since the publication of the novel, the name "Frankenstein" has often been used to refer to the monster itself.


It's also National Candy Corn Day


On October 30th, the country celebrates its favorite vegetable with National Candy Corn Day. Did you know that candy corn has been around for more than 100 years and has never changed its look, taste, or design?


In the late 1800s, George Renninger of Wunderle Candy Company created candy corn. His sweet treat represented the bright colors of corn kernels. Originally, candy corn was yellow, orange and white. However, it wasn’t until1889 that the Goelitz Candy Company made the candy popular. Later, other candy makers developed a variety of popular colors and flavors as well.  It was one of the first candies to feature three different colors!


The original confection was made by hand using corn syrup, sugar, water, marshmallows,

fondant and carnauba wax (a wax made from the leaves of a palm tree). However, modern candy makers produce the treat using machines while using the original ingredients.

These days, numerous recipes create the candy corn flavors in cakes, cookies, beverages, and more.


HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalCandyCornDay


Candy corn inspires desserts, too. Add the candy to popcorn for a spooktacular treat. Another delicious way to celebrate the day would be to layer gelatin, pudding or cakes with white, yellow and orange colors and flavors. Salty and sweet always pair well together, too. Add pretzels, candy corn, and nuts to a snack mix.

Try this terrific candy corn cookie recipe.


Candy Corn Cookies

  • Total Time Prep: 35 min. + chilling Bake: 10 min./batch

  • Makes about 5 dozen


Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 cups butter, softened

  • 1-1/2 cups sugar

  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour

  • 1 teaspoon baking soda

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • Yellow and orange paste food coloring

Directions Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy, 5-7 minutes. Beat in vanilla. In another bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda and salt; gradually beat into creamed mixture.

  • Divide dough in half. Tint 1 portion yellow. Divide remaining dough into two-thirds and one-third portions. Color the larger portion orange; leave smaller portion plain.

  • Shape each portion of dough into two 8-in. logs. Flatten top and push sides in at a slight angle. Place orange logs on yellow logs; push sides in at a slight angle. Top with plain logs, forming a slightly rounded top. Wrap and refrigerate until firm, about 4 hours.

  • Preheat oven to 350°. Unwrap and cut dough into 1/4-in. slices. Place 2 in. apart on ungreased baking sheets.

  • Bake until set, 10-12 minutes. Remove from pans to wire racks to cool.

Nutrition Facts 1 cookie: 83 calories, 5g fat (3g saturated fat), 12mg cholesterol, 77mg sodium, 10g carbohydrate (5g sugars, 0 fiber), 1g protein.


Today, candy corn is a favorite American treat to enjoy during the Halloween season. The National Confectioners Association estimates that 20 million pounds of candy corn are sold annually. Grab a handful to celebrate National Candy Corn Day!


Geeze that makes me hungry for cookies. Hey moooom. What do you think, think she'll make me cookies. I'll let you know.


Until tomorrow ya'll stay safe out there. Love Queen Beanie.



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